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by on April 28, 2018
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Protesters holding “Levi’s are made from coal” banner and posters illustrating Levi’s impact on the environment.

Protestors convened in front of the Levi Strauss & Co.’s store in Times Square this week to raise awareness in a unique way.

They took off their pants.

The “Too Dirty to Wear” campaign claims that the fashion industry is complicit in exacerbating air pollution

Activists with the international environmental organization Stand.earth removed their jeans as part of an effort to raise awareness about the apparel company's impact on the environment.

The campaign, dubbed “Too Dirty to Wear,” claims that Levi’s and the fashion industry as a whole are complicit in exacerbating air pollution, contributing to approximately 8 percent of global "climate pollution."

Levi's annual production, alone, is equal to that of 1.1 million cars, Stand.earth says.

The Stand.earth protest came one day after the organization released its “Too Deadly to Wear” report, detailing the fashion industry’s role in the impact of air pollution across the globe.

The protest comes as Levi Strauss enjoys its strongest revenue performance in 10 years.

The San Francisco-based company recently announced that its revenue grew 8 percent to $4.9 billion in 2017. Direct-to-consumer sales from the company's own retail stores were up 20 percent in the fourth quarter and contributed to Levi’s growth.

The brand also saw growth in online sales.

Stand.earth is calling on Levi’s to be a fashion industry leader in protecting the environment by reducing pollution and transitioning to renewable energy in its supply chain.

Stand.earth, also based in San Francisco, held the protest one day after releasing a report titled “Too Deadly To Wear: Levi’s Pollution," which called on Levi’s to set an example for the fashion industry and transition to renewable energy.

Stand.earth isn't the only organization scrutinizing the apparel industry.

About 20 percent of industrial water pollution is due to garment manufacturing, according to World Resources Institute.

Stand.earth is calling on Levi’s to be a fashion industry leader in protecting the environment by reducing pollution and transitioning to renewable energy in its supply chain.

Also, the average consumer is now purchasing 60 percent more items of clothing compared to 2000, and each garment is kept half as long (h/t McKinsey.com).

Still, the industry shows no sign of slowing down. Levi’s is planning to open 100 new stores this year, mostly outside of the U.S., according to Apparel News.

The brand is also focused on building international sales in China, India and the Americas. Levi’s has 230 stores, with 180 located in outlet malls.

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Levi's: Too Deadly To Wear

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